Friends of the Earth unveils colossal Poseidon for Earth Day 2018

Poseidon comes to Saunton Sands to illustrate marine plastic pollution

Devon was visited today (13 April 2018) by a hundred feet tall Poseidon, who is angry about the plastic pollution destroying oceans. Created by Wales-based Marc Treanor, the sand etching was commissioned by the European Environmental Bureau and backed by Friends of the Earth.
13 Apr 2018     |       2 minute read

Marc’s work was visible for several hours before the tide came in and carried Poseidon back to the ocean.

This comes as new polling data commissioned by Friends of the Earth indicates that 81% of people have done something to reduce or cut out their use of plastic, for example by purchasing a reusable shopping bag or avoiding the use of plastic straws.  

Julian Kirby, plastic-free campaigner for Friends of the Earth, said:

“Poseidon has been defending oceans for millennia, but the current plastic pollution crisis is more terrifying than any sea monster. Tougher measures are urgently needed to protect our oceans, beaches and wildlife.

“The government must listen to the huge public concern over this issue, and chart a course for cleaner seas by committing to end all plastic pollution.”

Marc Treanor, the sand artist behind the work, said:

“I was happy to be asked to be part of this project as the subject of plastic pollution awareness seems now to have reached a critical point.  I wanted to somehow express an anger with what plastic pollution has done to the oceans, so the image of a raging Neptune hurling a plastic bottle back at us seemed apt.”   

The Saunton Sands Poseidon is one of 6 works appearing on beaches across Europe in the run-up to Earth Day on 22 April. The theme of Earth Day this year is “end plastic pollution”, with all the works carrying the hashtag #BreakFreeFromPlastic, a global movement envisioning a future free from plastic pollution.

Those who want to act against plastic can join the 60,000 people who have signed Friends of the Earth’s petition calling for the government to dramatically reduce the plastic pouring into our oceans